Red Hat

WildFly 20 is released!

I’m pleased to announce that the WildFly 20 Final zip is now available for download.

After the big push on Eclipse MicroProfile 3.3 for WildFly 19, the focus for WildFly 20 was more on bug fixing and component updates. Between WildFly Core and full WildFly we resolved well over 100 bugs and did over 90 component upgrades, most of which also brought bug fixes. These are challenging times for all of us, with a lot of disruption in our lives, and I’m very proud of how much the many people contributing to WildFly have gotten done over these last couple of months.

But, of course, it wasn’t all bug fixing! So, what else is new?

Enhancements

Security

As always, the folks working on security have been busy:

EJB

  • The standard way to configure stateful bean session timeout for each ejb is via a @StatefulTimeout annotation, or a stateful-timeout setting in ejb-jar.xml. But if these are not provided WildFly now provides the ability to configure a default global stateful bean session timeout for all deployed stateful beans. This feature is useful for deploying and configuring multiple stateful beans consistently in a server instance or a cluster.

  • In a clustered environment where EJB timers are persisting to a shared database, applications may not want to rely solely on a periodic refresh of their timers before performing certain tasks. With WildFly 20 it is now possible to programmatically refresh EJB timers that use a database-data-store for persistence.

  • A large amount of information about the EJBs in a deployment is now available via the server management API.

MicroProfile Integration

  • RESTEasy (integrated in WildFly via the jaxrs subsystem) can now be configured using MicroProfile Config. In addition, the jaxrs subsystem now exposes servlet init parameters, filter init parameters and servlet context parameters to applications as MicroProfile Config config sources.

  • An example CLI script has been added to the server’s docs/examples directory to help users migrate a standalone configuration to one more like the standalone-microprofile.xml configuration WildFly provides.

Standards Support

WildFly 20.0.0 is a Jakarta EE 8 compatible implementation, with both the Full Platform and the Web Profile. Evidence supporting our certification is available for the Full Platform and for the Web Profile.

WildFly 20 is also a compatible implementation of Java EE 8.

WildFly 20 is also a compliant implementation of the Eclipse MicroProfile 3.3 platform specification.

JDK Support

For the last couple of years we’ve worked to ensure our releases run well for most developer use cases on the most recent GA JDK version available on the WildFly final release date. Unfortunately, that came to an end with WildFly 19 and JDK 14. We haven’t had time to digest some of the package removals in JDK 14, particularly in the security area.

However, I do believe WildFly runs well on JDK 13. By run well, I mean the main WildFly testsuite runs with no more than a few failures in areas not expected to be commonly used. We want developers who are trying to evaluate what the latest JVM means for their applications to be able to look to WildFly as a useful development platform. We do see a couple of test failures with JDK 13 when using the deprecated Picketlink subsystem and WS Trust

While we do want to run well on the most recent JDK, our recommendation is that you run WildFly on the most recent long-term support release, i.e. on JDK 11 for WildFly 20. We do considerably more testing of WildFly itself on the LTS JDKs, and we make no attempt to ensure the projects producing the various libraries we integrate are testing their libraries on anything other than JDK 8 or 11.

WildFly 20 also is heavily tested and runs well on Java 8. We plan to continue to support Java 8 at least through WildFly 22, and probably beyond.

Please note that WildFly runs on Java 11 and later in classpath mode.

At this point it is uncertain when we’ll be able to say that a release of WildFly runs well on JDK 14 or later. We’ll have to see how well the work for that, both in WildFly itself and in the projects we integrate, aligns with our other goals. I don’t expect it to be a priority before WildFly 22.

Documentation

The WildFly 20 documentation is available at the docs.wildfly.org site.

Just a reminder, starting with WildFly 19 we shifted the location of the auto-generated documentation of the appserver management API from the wildscribe.github.io site to a make it part of the general documentation for a release. The WildFly 20 management API documentation is in the wildscribe section of the WildFly 20 docs.

Jira Release Notes

The full list of issues resolved is available here. Issues resolved in the WildFly Core 12 releases included with WildFly 20 are available here.

Enjoy!

I hope this post finds you and your loved ones all safe and well. Please give WildFly 20 a spin and give us your feedback!

Brian Stansberry

Brian Stansberry is the current lead of the WildFly application server project. He is best known for the development of the administration and management capabilities in WildFly and JBoss EAP 6. Previously, he was the technical lead for the application server’s high availability clustering features. Brian’s background is in international business and East Asian studies, with a bachelor’s degree from Michigan State and a master’s degree from Stanford. Before getting bitten by the software bug, Brian had a successful career in corporate finance in the semiconductor industry. He started working on JBoss technologies in 2003 and joined the company in 2005.

Location:  Ballwin, MO

Occupation:  WildFly Project Lead

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